Meet the 2017-2019 CCES Board of Directors

Meet the 2017-2019 CCES Board of Directors

Creative Change Educational Solutions was initially started as a proactive solution to help educators transform curriculum for better schools, more impassioned teachers, and fully engaged students. While the initial vision was mine, CCES is not a one-woman show. Our organization features a board of directors, advisors and staff members with expertise in education and other strategic fields. In this way, our evolving story is like an anthology — we gather diverse voices to ensure our work remains effective and ahead of the curve. With the start of the new year, we’re pleased to announce the 2017-2019 CCES board of directors. Board Members James Haughn (Returning Member) is a practicing attorney and active member of the law community in Toledo, Ohio. He has a history of service to others, including time as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal, West Africa, working in agroforestry and desertification abatement. Martha Kaufeldt is a full-time consultant with extensive expertise in brain compatible learning, differentiated instruction and integrated curriculum for all grade levels. Among other professional accomplishments, she has taught at all grade levels, served as a district-level gifted coordinator and staff developer, and most recently was the lead teacher and restructuring coordinator of a demonstration “brain-compatible” school. Learn more about Martha and her company at Begin with the Brain or connect with her on Twitter @MarthaKaufeldt. David Reynolds, PhD, works at the Labor and Community Studies Center at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and was formerly a labor educator at Wayne State University. His research and teaching specialties include social movements, labor-community coalitions, curriculum development, and strategic planning. Connect with David on LinkedIn. Paula Sizemore is a...
How (and Why) to Talk About Holidays and Religion in Your Classroom

How (and Why) to Talk About Holidays and Religion in Your Classroom

In this blog, we revisit how to talk about the holidays and religion. While these tips are especially applicable right now, they can be used to help us understand cultural celebrations any time of year. Cue singing children:            It’s that time of year… Christmas is so near… Wait! Can we say that in a public school?! The holidays are a time for tradition. For instance, it’s the annual time of year when educators grapple with questions of faith and inclusion in their classrooms and schools. What is appropriate to celebrate? What decorations are allowed? Can the choir sing “Silent Night” in the Christmas—oops!—holiday concert? To avoid potential controversy, some schools ban the mention of holidays or religions altogether. Yet, in this divisive atmosphere (hate crimes against Muslims were up 67% in 2015, and hate crimes of all kinds spiked after the election), it’s even more important to know how to talk about this and not just sweep it under the (prayer?) rug. With the fire (from the Yule log?) burning so hot, it is understandable to not want to add any fuel. However, in an increasingly diverse society, schools have an obligation to help students collaborate across cultures and religions. We can’t learn about other beliefs by pretending they don’t exist. Give students the gift of understanding this holiday season, and let them help guide how we handle these questions. Three of our favorite strategies for real learning—not just feel-good gestures—when discussing holidays and religion in school: Give students a voice: What do you know about the traditions and celebrations that are important to your students? Provide opportunities for students...
Relevance and Equity in Next Generation Science Standards: 3 Little Words

Relevance and Equity in Next Generation Science Standards: 3 Little Words

Science educators across the country are rolling out the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and equity is top on their minds. The teachers and administrators we work with ask us one thing: How can we make these standards relevant in ways that engage diverse learners? The urgency is real, especially in districts serving low-income students and students of color–those whose experiences are often unheard and unseen in the curriculum. Three little words can turn this around. Three little words can infuse relevance and equity into cells, soil structure, the periodic table, and other yawn-worthy topics (at least from the kids’ perspective). In a new blog series, we’ll introduce the power of ethics, wellbeing, and community to transform curriculum. We’ll share strategies for helping teachers use these words to (re)designing scientific inquiry to answers the questions kids really have: Why are things this way? How can we explain this? How can it change, and what can I do?  These are real stories from real classrooms and on-the-ground professional development programs. Read the first post here: Next Generation Science Standards Under the Equity Microscope New posts will be shared via Twitter with links to in-depth resources. We also want to hear from you. Get in on the action. Follow us and share your Tweets using the hashtags including #ContentThatMatters, #ContentMatters, #NextGen, #edequity, #CurriculumMaker, #UnitMakeover, or your...