Meet the 2017-2019 CCES Board of Directors

Meet the 2017-2019 CCES Board of Directors

Creative Change Educational Solutions was initially started as a proactive solution to help educators transform curriculum for better schools, more impassioned teachers, and fully engaged students. While the initial vision was mine, CCES is not a one-woman show. Our organization features a board of directors, advisors and staff members with expertise in education and other strategic fields. In this way, our evolving story is like an anthology — we gather diverse voices to ensure our work remains effective and ahead of the curve. With the start of the new year, we’re pleased to announce the 2017-2019 CCES board of directors. Board Members James Haughn (Returning Member) is a practicing attorney and active member of the law community in Toledo, Ohio. He has a history of service to others, including time as a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal, West Africa, working in agroforestry and desertification abatement. Martha Kaufeldt is a full-time consultant with extensive expertise in brain compatible learning, differentiated instruction and integrated curriculum for all grade levels. Among other professional accomplishments, she has taught at all grade levels, served as a district-level gifted coordinator and staff developer, and most recently was the lead teacher and restructuring coordinator of a demonstration “brain-compatible” school. Learn more about Martha and her company at Begin with the Brain or connect with her on Twitter @MarthaKaufeldt. David Reynolds, PhD, works at the Labor and Community Studies Center at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and was formerly a labor educator at Wayne State University. His research and teaching specialties include social movements, labor-community coalitions, curriculum development, and strategic planning. Connect with David on LinkedIn. Paula Sizemore is a...
Shifting the Story: Getting the Metaphorical Rock Up the Hill

Shifting the Story: Getting the Metaphorical Rock Up the Hill

Just three days after the presidential election, with raw nerves and a lingering feeling of aftershock, I gave a presentation at the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) national conference in Cleveland. My presentation partner, Dr. Shari Saunders (Associate Dean for Undergraduate and Teacher Education at the University of Michigan School of Education), and I were not sure what to expect. The NAME 2016 national conference theme focused on amplifying “the voices of those who suffer marginalization in various forms; and in doing so expose inequities that are ignored and silenced.”  To address this, Dr. Saunders and I focused our session on teaching institutional discrimination in secondary classrooms, and offered clear and effective instructional methods to move beyond posters, holidays, and “diversity days.” Our core objectives were to: Illustrate methods for connecting multicultural education to required standards (Common Core). Demonstrate how this can support curriculum depth and educational equity in an era when schools are narrowing curriculum due to testing. Demonstrate methods for sequencing in-depth instruction on race that gradually and effectively builds students’ understanding of institutional discrimination. We were blown away by the high-caliber of educators who awaited us. Their eagerness to apply what we offered was validation that our work is not just about bringing diversity lessons into the classroom, but to ultimately change the story of the educational system. We are inspired by our colleagues and allies working in K20 classrooms across the country. Keeping the Momentum The timing of the conference —  just days after a divisive, controversial candidate was elected to the highest political role in the world — was a powerful opportunity to...
Community Transformation through Social Justice, Sustainability and Education

Community Transformation through Social Justice, Sustainability and Education

Students of Detroit Community Schools in Detroit’s Brightmoor neighborhood were faced with a challenge. All across the city, as well as in their own neighborhoods, the water was getting shut off – leaving residents to collect rain water from roofs using rain barrels. However, the water was not safe for drinking. The students, guided by their teacher Bart Eddy and a team from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, looked for solutions. The students have been converting industrial tricycles that transport water purification units to residents who have had their water shut off. The Water Cycler units run on solar power to purify the water collected in the rain barrels. As part of the Water Cyclers project, Creative Change Educational Solutions (CCES) is linking together the real-world experience with classroom content through a well-developed curriculum. “This curriculum will help students address issues surrounding climate change, and will all be woven into the youth employment and leadership.” – Bart Eddy, Educator We have united the different parts of the project, showing how science, sustainability, and social justice are connected. Through their work and our framework of lessons, students are learning not just what it means to be part of a community where we help each other, but also hands-on skills to convert the bikes, teamwork, leadership among peers, creativity, the science behind the Cycler units, and the importance of local and global...