Next Generation Science Standards Under the Equity Microscope

Next Generation Science Standards Under the Equity Microscope

The bell rings, and thirty-three 9th-graders in a high-poverty urban high school slump into their seats. Time for biology class. Some lay their heads down, some are agitated, some talk with their friends–but not about DNA, this week’s focus from the Next Generation Science Standards. This was the picture Annette, their science teacher, recently shared with me. “They’re tired, hungry and stressed,” she said. “Why should they care about cells and DNA?” It was a good question. But as the curriculum consultant hired by the district, I had to help Annette not only find an answer, but also build a unit around it. The unit needed to integrated Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Language Arts Standards. Culturally responsive instruction was essential. We had a big job ahead of us. I told the teachers to put their standards aside. We weren’t going to plan around standards. Instead, we were going to focus on the significance of DNA in students’ lives, cultures and histories. “And what about the standards?” they asked. “Standards will take care of themselves,” I assured them. With some uncertainty–even anxiety–about the approach, we dove into DNA as a social and cultural issue. I introduced Annette and her team to a process of reframing her content using the concepts of ethics and equity. We used hands-on activities that helped teachers explore the history behind DNA and its use and misuse in social policy. The content naturally enabled us to integrate NGSS Crosscutting Concepts such as cause and effect and systems thinking. Through the process, the teachers placed the science of DNA in the context of social...
Relevance and Equity in Next Generation Science Standards: 3 Little Words

Relevance and Equity in Next Generation Science Standards: 3 Little Words

Science educators across the country are rolling out the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and equity is top on their minds. The teachers and administrators we work with ask us one thing: How can we make these standards relevant in ways that engage diverse learners? The urgency is real, especially in districts serving low-income students and students of color–those whose experiences are often unheard and unseen in the curriculum. Three little words can turn this around. Three little words can infuse relevance and equity into cells, soil structure, the periodic table, and other yawn-worthy topics (at least from the kids’ perspective). In a new blog series, we’ll introduce the power of ethics, wellbeing, and community to transform curriculum. We’ll share strategies for helping teachers use these words to (re)designing scientific inquiry to answers the questions kids really have: Why are things this way? How can we explain this? How can it change, and what can I do?  These are real stories from real classrooms and on-the-ground professional development programs. Read the first post here: Next Generation Science Standards Under the Equity Microscope New posts will be shared via Twitter with links to in-depth resources. We also want to hear from you. Get in on the action. Follow us and share your Tweets using the hashtags including #ContentThatMatters, #ContentMatters, #NextGen, #edequity, #CurriculumMaker, #UnitMakeover, or your...